Can Specific Foods or Diets Boost Your Testosterone Levels?

Can Specific Foods or Diets Boost Your Testosterone Levels?

What you eat or drink may affect levels of the male sex hormone, but whether a diet can increase libido or energy depends on many things.

By Randi Hutter Epstein, M.D.

Published Nov. 2, 2021Updated Nov. 3, 2021

This article is a repost which originally appeared on The New York Times

Edited for content.

Can I increase my testosterone levels through the foods I eat? And if so, which foods or diets work best?

Many men, particularly as they age, are concerned about their levels of testosterone, the male sex hormone touted to build muscle, sex drive and vigor. But individual foods are unlikely to have an impact on testosterone levels — though drinking excessive amounts of alcohol might. If you are overweight, altering your diet to lose weight may help, since carrying excess pounds is a common cause of low testosterone. But in terms of specific foods or diets, any uptick you achieve may not have a noticeable impact on libido, energy or muscle mass.

“If someone was not overweight, I wouldn’t put them on a specific diet to raise testosterone based on the data we have now,” said Alexander Pastuszak, an assistant professor of urology and surgery at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, who co-authored a review on alternatives to testosterone therapy.

In men, normal testosterone levels range from 300 to 1,000 nanograms per deciliter of blood. Ups and downs within that normal range are unlikely to have any impact on sex drive or vitality. Only when levels consistently drop below 300 points — as confirmed in two blood tests by an accredited laboratory — are symptoms like low libido, erectile dysfunction, fatigue, low mood or loss of muscle mass likely to appear, a medical condition known as hypogonadism.

Starting at around age 40, men’s testosterone levels start to decline by about 1 percent per year. But the drop can vary tremendously, with some older men maintaining levels similar to healthy young men. The trajectory of falling testosterone is steeper among men who gain a lot of weight, said Dr. Shalender Bhasin, professor of medicine at Harvard and the director of the Research Program in Men’s Health: Aging and Metabolism at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Studies on foods or diets and testosterone levels have generally been small and the findings far from conclusive. A recent British review that pooled data from 206 volunteers, for example, found that men on high-fat diets had testosterone levels that were about 60 points higher, on average, than men on low-fat diets. Men who followed a vegetarian diet tended to have the lowest levels of testosterone, about 150 points lower, on average, than those following a high-fat, meat-based diet. Still, Joseph Whittaker, the lead investigator and a nutritionist at the University of Worcester in Britain, said he would not recommend a man increase the fats in his diet unless he had low testosterone levels and symptoms of low T and was already restricting fats.

Another study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research tested two styles of diets in 25 fit men between the ages of 18 and 30. Calories consumed were the same, but one group ate a high-fat, very-low-carb, ketogenic-style diet, consisting of 75 percent of calories from fats, 5 percent from carbohydrates and 20 percent from protein. Men in the other group ate a more traditional Western style, low-fat diet, containing 25 percent of calories from fats, 55 percent from carbohydrates and 20 percent from protein. After 10 weeks of eating the high-fat diet, testosterone increased by 118 points, on average, while after the low-fat diet, levels declined by about 36 points.

Similarly, a study of 3,000 men found that those who reported eating a low-fat diet had slightly lower testosterone levels — about 30 points lower — than men who ate higher-fat diets. But none of the men had low testosterone.

“The moral is that healthy men who are of normal weight with no significant comorbidities are unlikely to benefit from restrictive diets,” said Dr. Richard J. Fantus, one of the study’s authors and a urologist at NorthShore University HealthSystem in Evanston, Ill.

Diet studies are complicated, because changing one component of the diet, such as fat intake, alters so many other things, such as the amount of carbohydrates, protein and micronutrients consumed. It’s unclear which component of the diet may have prompted the hormonal changes, Dr. Bhasin said. Furthermore, testosterone levels may also be shaped by how much a person sleeps, or whether they are jet-lagged, or if they are eating most of their calories at night or in small meals throughout the day.

Dr. Faysal Yafi, chief of the division of Men’s Health and Reconstructive Urology at the University of California, Irvine, says his patients who opt to follow specific diets tend to start exercising more and drinking less alcohol, all of which can raise testosterone levels. He suspects any links between diet and testosterone may be the result of an overall healthier lifestyle.

Some men worry that eating lots of soy foods may cause their testosterone levels to fall, because soy is rich in isoflavones, which mimic the structure of estrogen. But the evidence doesn’t support their concerns, even if men eat foods like miso, tofu or soy milk at every meal. (Doctors did report one anecdotal case in which a 19-year-old man with Type 1 diabetes who followed a vegan diet containing 360 milligrams of soy isoflavones daily — nine times higher than a typical Japanese diet, and 100 times higher than the typical American diet — developed low testosterone levels along with low libido and fatigue. His symptoms improved when he stopped eating the soy-heavy, vegan diet.)

Long-term alcohol abuse lowers testosterone by damaging cells in both the testes, which make testosterone, and the liver, which alters testosterone metabolism. But binge drinking every now and then does not appear to have much of an impact — it lowers testosterone for only about 30 minutes, according to one study, after which levels bounce back to baseline.

Obese men who have low levels of testosterone can increase levels by cutting calories and losing weight — the type of diet does not matter, studies suggest. On the opposite extreme, Dr. Bhasin said he is seeing an increasing number of men at his clinic who have body dysmorphic issues and are suffering from low libido and fatigue. Strict calorie restriction, exercising intensely and being chronically stressed can all cause testosterone levels to plummet and are likely to blame, he said.

The bottom line is that for otherwise healthy men who are following a reasonably healthy lifestyle, fiddling with specific foods or the composition of the diet is not likely to make much of a difference on the testosterone score card. As Dr. Fantus of NorthShore University put it: “I don’t think there is a way to game the system to get really large increases by changing the diet.”

Correction: 

An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that men who ate low-fat diets tended to have higher testosterone levels. Men who ate high-fat diets tended to have the higher T levels.

The article also referred to a 19-year-old man with low testosterone levels who was eating a diet containing 360 milligrams of soy daily; his diet actually contained 360 milligrams of soy isoflavones.

 

Testosterone Levels: Can Specific Foods or Diets Boost Them?

Can Specific Foods or Diets Boost Your Testosterone Levels?

What you eat or drink may affect levels of the male sex hormone, but whether a diet can increase libido or energy depends on many things.

By Randi Hutter Epstein, M.D.

Nov. 2, 2021 Updated 12:15 p.m. ET

This article is a repost which originally appeared on The New York Times

Edited for content.

Can I increase my testosterone levels through the foods I eat? And if so, which foods or diets work best?

Many men, particularly as they age, are concerned about their levels of testosterone, the male sex hormone touted to build muscle, sex drive and vigor. But individual foods are unlikely to have an impact on testosterone levels — though drinking excessive amounts of alcohol might. If you are overweight, altering your diet to lose weight may help, since carrying excess pounds is a common cause of low testosterone. But in terms of specific foods or diets, any uptick you achieve may not have a noticeable impact on libido, energy or muscle mass.

“If someone was not overweight, I wouldn’t put them on a specific diet to raise testosterone based on the data we have now,” said Alexander Pastuszak, an assistant professor of urology and surgery at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, who co-authored a review on alternatives to testosterone therapy.

In men, normal testosterone levels range from 300 to 1,000 nanograms per deciliter of blood. Ups and downs within that normal range are unlikely to have any impact on sex drive or vitality. Only when levels consistently drop below 300 points — as confirmed in two blood tests by an accredited laboratory — are symptoms like low libido, erectile dysfunction, fatigue, low mood or loss of muscle mass likely to appear, a medical condition known as hypogonadism.

Starting at around age 40, men’s testosterone levels start to decline by about 1 percent per year. But the drop can vary tremendously, with some older men maintaining levels similar to healthy young men. The trajectory of falling testosterone is steeper among men who gain a lot of weight, said Dr. Shalender Bhasin, professor of medicine at Harvard and the director of the Research Program in Men’s Health: Aging and Metabolism at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Studies on foods or diets and testosterone levels have generally been small and the findings far from conclusive. A recent British review that pooled data from 206 volunteers, for example, found that men on low-fat diets had testosterone levels that were about 60 points higher, on average, than men on high-fat diets. Men who followed a vegetarian diet tended to have the lowest levels of testosterone, about 150 points lower, on average, than those following a high-fat, meat-based diet. Still, Joseph Whittaker, the lead investigator and a nutritionist at the University of Worcester in Britain, said he would not recommend a man increase the fats in his diet unless he had low testosterone levels and symptoms of low T and was already restricting fats.

Another study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research tested two styles of diets in 25 fit men between the ages of 18 and 30. Calories consumed were the same, but one group ate a high-fat, very-low-carb, ketogenic-style diet, consisting of 75 percent of calories from fats, 5 percent from carbohydrates and 20 percent from protein. Men in the other group ate a more traditional Western style, low-fat diet, containing 25 percent of calories from fats, 55 percent from carbohydrates and 20 percent from protein. After 10 weeks of eating the high-fat diet, testosterone increased by 118 points, on average, while after the low-fat diet, levels declined by about 36 points

Similarly, a study of 3,000 men found that those who reported eating a low-fat diet had slightly lower testosterone levels — about 30 points lower — than men who ate higher-fat diets. But none of the men had low testosterone.

“The moral is that healthy men who are of normal weight with no significant comorbidities are unlikely to benefit from restrictive diets,” said Dr. Richard J. Fantus, one of the study’s authors and a urologist at NorthShore University HealthSystem in Evanston, Ill.

Diet studies are complicated, because changing one component of the diet, such as fat intake, alters so many other things, such as the amount of carbohydrates, protein and micronutrients consumed. It’s unclear which component of the diet may have prompted the hormonal changes, Dr. Bhasin said. Furthermore, testosterone levels may also be shaped by how much a person sleeps, or whether they are jet-lagged, or if they are eating most of their calories at night or in small meals throughout the day.

Dr. Faysal Yafi, chief of the division of Men’s Health and Reconstructive Urology at the University of California, Irvine, says his patients who opt to follow specific diets tend to start exercising more and drinking less alcohol, all of which can raise testosterone levels. He suspects any links between diet and testosterone may be the result of an overall healthier lifestyle.

Some men worry that eating lots of soy foods may cause their testosterone levels to fall, because soy is rich in isoflavones, which mimic the structure of estrogen. But the evidence doesn’t support their concerns, even if men eat foods like miso, tofu or soy milk at every meal. (Doctors did report one anecdotal case in which a 19-year-old man with Type 1 diabetes who followed a vegan diet containing 360 milligrams of soy daily — nine times higher than a typical Japanese diet, and 100 times higher than the typical American diet — developed low testosterone levels along with low libido and fatigue. His symptoms improved when he stopped eating the soy-heavy, vegan diet.)

Long-term alcohol abuse lowers testosterone by damaging cells in both the testes, which make testosterone, and the liver, which alters testosterone metabolism. But binge drinking every now and then does not appear to have much of an impact — it lowers testosterone for only about 30 minutes, according to one study, after which levels bounce back to baseline.

Obese men who have low levels of testosterone can increase levels by cutting calories and losing weight — the type of diet does not matter, studies suggest. On the opposite extreme, Dr. Bhasin said he is seeing an increasing number of men at his clinic who have body dysmorphic issues and are suffering from low libido and fatigue. Strict calorie restriction, exercising intensely and being chronically stressed can all cause testosterone levels to plummet and are likely to blame, he said.

The bottom line is that for otherwise healthy men who are following a reasonably healthy lifestyle, fiddling with specific foods or the composition of the diet is not likely to make much of a difference on the testosterone score card. As Dr. Fantus of NorthShore University put it: “I don’t think there is a way to game the system to get really large increases by changing the diet.”

 

Aloe for Male Enhancement: Is It Safe and Does It Work?

Aloe for Male Enhancement: Is It Safe and Does It Work?

Medically reviewed by Joseph Brito III, MD — Written by Rachael Zimlich on June 7, 2021

This article is a repost which originally appeared on Healthline

Edited for content.

Aloe vera can be found in many products. It can help boost the moisture content of your skin and even help heal burns and other wounds.

While it may seem like something of a miracle product, it can’t help with everything. In fact, you may want to be cautious before applying it everywhere — including your genitalia.

Keep reading to find out how aloe vera can be used for sexual health and when to avoid it.

What is male enhancement?

Male enhancement is a general phrase used to describe any efforts to improve the appearance, size, or function of genitalia — specifically the penis.

Some common enhancement strategies include:

  • stretches and exercises
  • topical or oral medications and herbal remedies
  • pumps
  • clamps and rings
  • surgery
  • grooming techniques

The goal of these strategies is to increase the size or appearance of the penis, improve erection strength and duration, or resolve ejaculation issues.

In some cases, male enhancement aims to treat erectile dysfunction (ED). This term typically refers to the inability to have or maintain an erection, but there can be varying levels of ED. In many cases, there’s another root issue, like cardiovascular disease or a medication side effect.

Improvement of ED is commonly pursued either for sexual pleasure or fertility purposes. Treatments should be designed based on the goal in mind.

Talk with a doctor about your specific symptoms and goals before beginning any new therapies or medications.

Does research support the use of topical aloe vera for male enhancement?

The use of aloe vera for general health and skin care is fairly common. However, you may be wondering if it could be used for male enhancement.

Most herbal or plant remedies are based in cultural practices, but there’s not a lot of clinical research on some claims of aloe vera benefits, like male enhancement.

Some studies have been done with animals, but the results were generally inconclusive. If anything, some of these studies raised concern about the use of aloe vera for sexual health benefits.

Here’s a breakdown of some relevant research in this area:

  • In a 2011 animal study, topical aloe vera reduced sperm concentration and quality.
  • A 2014 study showed possible benefits to sperm health and hormone levels in mice that received injections of an aloe vera compound.
  • A 2015 study showed that that aloe vera may potentially harm fertility in male rats.
  • There have been reports of libido enhancement with aloe use, but results may vary based on the specific form of aloe.

If you’re concerned about ED or another sexual health issue, talk with a healthcare professional. They can help guide you toward the right treatment for your situation.

Other natural treatments for male enhancement

There are many natural remedies you can try if you’re interested in male enhancement. However, you should always discuss any supplements you’re considering with a doctor first.

Several herbal remedies that have shown promising effects on male sexual health and performance include:

  • L-arginine
  • panax ginseng
  • L-citrulline
  • L-carnitine
  • gingko biloba

Other ways to improve your sexual health and performance include focusing on an overall healthy lifestyle, including:

  • staying active and exercising
  • eating a healthy diet
  • reducing stress
  • avoiding alcohol and other drugs
  • spending time outdoors

While regular exercise and a healthy diet are always good choices, talk with your doctor before starting any new therapies or supplements for male enhancement.

How is aloe vera used?

Aloe vera has been used on the skin and in the body for thousands of years. It can be found in all kinds of products — from juices to lotions.

Oral use of aloe vera usually comes in a pill form or as liquid extract or juice that you can drink. It’s thought to help with the following conditions:

  • obesity
  • diabetes
  • hepatitis
  • inflammatory bowel disease

However, there isn’t enough data to determine if oral aloe is effective for improving these conditions.

Evidence on the benefits of topical use — such as a gel, ointment, or lotion — is clearer, demonstrating that aloe can be helpful in treating:

  • acne
  • lichen planus
  • oral submucous fibrosis
  • burning mouth syndrome
  • burns
  • scabies
  • skin toxicity due to radiation

While aloe vera is generally considered safe, be sure to check the ingredients of the specific product you’re using.

Some oral aloe products may contain additional compounds that could result in side effects or interact with other medications. Even topical products may be mixed with alcohol compounds or other ingredients that can cause irritation.

Are there any possible side effects?

Aloe vera is widely used as both a topical and oral supplement. However, there have been some side effects linked to aloe vera use — either orally or topically — including:

  • liver problems
  • skin irritation
  • stomach pain or cramps
  • diarrhea
  • electrolyte imbalances

To avoid side effects, read the label of the product you’re using to understand all the ingredients it contains. You should also check for safety statements on the label.

For topical uses, it’s also a good idea to do a patch test by applying a small amount of product to an area of skin to test for sensitivity or irritation before applying liberally. This is particularly important when it comes to applying topicals, like aloe vera, to sensitive skin areas, like your genitalia.

The bottom line

There isn’t much evidence showing that aloe vera helps improve the size of your penis or your sexual performance.

However, if you decide to try it as a topical or oral supplement for enhancement, be sure to check the product’s safety, like performing a skin patch test before widespread application.

Always talk with your doctor or another healthcare professional about any supplements you plan on taking and your reason for taking them. They may be able to help treat the source of any sexual health problems you’re facing.

Healthline has strict sourcing guidelines and relies on peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions, and medical associations. We avoid using tertiary references. You can learn more about how we ensure our content is accurate and current by reading our editorial policy.

Sexercise: What is it? Benefits, exercises to try, and more

The benefits of sexercise and how to practice it

Medically reviewed by Janet Brito, Ph.D., LCSW, CST — Written by Zawn Villines on December 13, 2020

This article is a repost which originally appeared on MEDICALNEWSTODAY

Edited for content

Sexercise is exercise to improve sexual performance and function, which may make sex more satisfying for a person and their partner or partners.

Celebrity trainer Jason Rosell coined the term sexercise, using it for a specific set of practices to improve a person’s sexual experience.

Physical fitness can affect sexuality by making sex easier and more comfortable, reducing the risk of erectile dysfunction (ED) and arousal issues, and helping people feel more confident in their bodies.

Exercise may also reduce the risk of chronic illnesses, such as diabetes, that can cause sexual issues.

A person may use the term sexercise to refer to a wide range of activities, while any exercise specifically to improve sex counts as sexercise.

Benefits of sexual activity for health

Healthful, consensual sexual activity of all varieties can improve health.

Some benefits of sex include:

  • Better heart health: Sex involves exercise, which can improve heart health by lowering blood pressure and decreasing the risk of heart disease. A 2020 study found that, following a heart attack, people who had sex more than once per week had a 27% reduction in their risk of dying.
  • A healthier immune system: Regular sex may boost immunity, reducing a person’s risk of acquiring infections and certain illnesses.
  • Better emotional health: Sex – and the exercise that sex involves – may reduce the risk of depression and anxiety.
  • Better self-esteem: People who have satisfying sex may feel good about themselves.
  • Healthy relationships: A strong, healthy sexual connection with a partner may improve the relationship.
  • Better sleep: Sex may help some people fall asleep faster.
  • Stress management: Sex can be a suitable self-care tool that helps relieve stress.

It is important to note that sex in itself does not necessarily improve health.

Non-consensual, painful, or unpleasant sex may cause severe emotional distress, physical injuries, and other health issues.

Benefits of fitness for sexual performance

Exercise can improve sexual performance in many ways:

  • Reducing ED: In people with penises, regular exercise – especially aerobic exercise such as running or walking – may reduce ED. A 2017 meta-analysis found moderate to high-intensity aerobic exercise provided optimal benefits.
  • Counteracting side effects of certain antidepressants on the libido: A 2013 study of females taking antidepressants found that exercising right before sex improved both arousal and global sexual function.
  • Exercise may reduce the risk of chronic medical conditions: These conditions can interfere with sexual performance. For example, diabetes has links with ED, arousal disorders, and some other sexual issues.
  • Improving sexual function: Certain exercises may strengthen the pelvic floor muscles, which a person uses during sex. Kegel exercises can help a person orgasm more easily and help with urine leakage and incontinence.
  • Increasing endurance and strength: This may make certain positions and types of sex easier. More endurance may help a person be less tired during prolonged sex sessions.

Exercises to improve sexual performance

Three categories of exercise can help improve sexual performance:

Aerobic exercise

Aerobic exercise increases the heart rate. It can help a person maintain a moderate weight, improve blood pressure, boost overall physical fitness, and may help with ED and general sexual performance. Some exercises to try include:

  • Swimming: Offers an intense but low-impact workout for people with joint or muscle pain.
  • Walking: An ideal starting exercise for people who struggle with more intense workouts.
  • Intense aerobic exercise: Includes running or jogging, jumping rope, skiing, and using a stair-climber machine.

Pelvic floor exercises

Pelvic floor exercises strengthen the pelvic floor – a group of muscles that support the bladder. These muscles also contract during an orgasm. Try the following to work them:

  • Performing Kegels:
    • Locate the right muscles when urinating.
    • Stop passing urine mid-flow for a few seconds, then start again.
    • Repeat a few times daily.
    • Next, try tensing and releasing the same muscles used to stop urinating several times per day.
    • Work up to tensing the muscles for longer: 5 seconds, 10 seconds, 30 seconds, or longer.
  • Exercising the multifidus of the pelvic floor:
    • Lie on the stomach, face down, with the forehead in the hands.
    • Lift the pelvis slightly back to point the tailbone toward the ceiling.
    • Hold for 5–10 seconds, working up to three sets of 10 repetitions.
  • Performing squats: Squats help strengthen the body, and in high repetitions, they can provide an intense cardio workout. They also help strengthen the abs and pelvic floor. Not everyone can do a squat at first. Try squatting down as much as possible without bending the back or taking the heels off the floor, then build up to deeper squats.

Strength and flexibility training

Improving general strength and flexibility may make certain sexual positions easier and more comfortable. Some options include:

  • Yoga and pilates: Both focus activities on improving flexibility and functional movement. People can even adapt some yoga positions into sex positions.
  • Lifting weights: Try lifting weights to improve the strength of various muscles and muscle groups. For example, a person who wants to lift their partner might try bench presses and other exercises that strengthen the upper body.
  • Bodyweight exercises: A person does not need weights to strengthen their muscles. Bodyweight exercises, such as leg raises, knee tucks, and squats strengthen the core, lower body, and pelvic floor. Pushups, pullups, and dips target the upper body, potentially making certain positions easier.

Sex positions that couples can use as exercise

Every sex position may present an opportunity for exercise if it meets one of two conditions:

  • The speed and intensity of the sexual activity are intense enough to elevate the heart rate.
  • The activity is physically challenging. For example, it requires stretching or involves a person lifting additional weight.

Some examples of specific positions that might help sexual partners get a workout include:

  • Positions that require a partner to fully or partially lift another: For example, a person who wraps their legs around a partner while the partner holds them in a standing position requires both partners to bear extra weight.
  • Positions that increase physical intensity and encourage partners to move more: For example, if a person is up against the wall with their legs wrapped around their partner, and the other partner is holding them, the couple is both supporting weights. They may also have to move more to increase stimulation and adjust the position.
  • Positions that encourage gentle stretching: It is important not to force the body into an uncomfortable position. However, extending the legs over a partner’s shoulders or getting into yoga-like positions may increase the challenge of sexual activity.

Summary

Exercise is great for overall health, including sexual health.

For most people, exercise is a safe way to improve well-being and sexual performance.

However, those who do not exercise should talk with a doctor before beginning a new fitness routine.

Medical News Today has strict sourcing guidelines and draws only from peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions, and medical journals and associations. We avoid using tertiary references. We link primary sources — including studies, scientific references, and statistics — within each article and also list them in the resources section at the bottom of our articles. You can learn more about how we ensure our content is accurate and current by reading our editorial policy.

10 Natural Ways to Boost Your Libido

Boost Your Libido with These 10 Natural Tips

Medically reviewed by University of Illinois — Written by Alexia Severson — Updated on May 11, 2019

This article is a repost which originally appeared on Healthline

Edited for content

The natural approach

Looking to spice up your sex life? There are a variety of things you can do in your everyday life that can help boost your libido and enhance your sex life.

1. Try eating certain fruits

Little evidence supports the effectiveness of certain foods, but there’s no harm in experimenting.

Figs, bananas, and avocados, for example, are considered libido-boosting foods, known as aphrodisiacs.

But these foods also provide important vitamins and minerals that can increase blood flow to the genitals and promote a healthy sex life.

2. Try eating chocolate

Throughout history, chocolate has been a symbol of desire. Not just because of its delicious taste, but because of its power to improve sexual pleasure.

According to one study, chocolate promotes the release of phenylethylamine and serotonin into your body. This can produce some aphrodisiac and mood-lifting effects.

According to another study, the effects of chocolate on sexuality are probably more psychological than biological.

3. Take your daily herbs

Next time you decide to sit down for a romantic dinner, add a little basil or garlic to your dish. The smell of basil stimulates the senses. Garlic contains high levels of allicin, and increases blood flow.

These effects may help men with erectile dysfunction.

Ginkgo bilobaTrusted Source, an extract derived from the leaf of the Chinese ginkgo tree, is another herb found to treat antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction.

4. Take a tip from Africa

Yohimbine, an alkaloid found in the bark of the West African evergreen, has been known to work as a natural Viagra.

Some studies suggest that Yohimbine bark can help you maintain an erection. It will also enhance the quality of an erection. However, researchers say there is no natural equivalent to match Viagra.

5. Boost your self-confidence

The way you feel about your body affects the way you feel about sex. An unhealthy diet and lack of exercise may cause you to have a poor self-image. These things can discourage you from having and enjoying sex.

You can boost your self-esteem and your sex drive by shifting the focus from your flaws to your attributes. You can also focus on the pleasure experienced during sex.

6. Stick to one glass of wine

Two glasses of wine might be one too many. Drinking one glass of wine can put you at ease and increase your interest in becoming intimate. But too much alcohol can ruin your ability to perform by affecting erectile function. Too much alcohol can also inhibit your ability to orgasm.

7. Take time to meditate and relieve stress

No matter how healthy you are, being stressed out is going to affect your sex drive. Women are particularly susceptible to the effects stress can have on one’s sex life.

Men, on the other hand, sometimes use sex to relieve stress. And sometimes differences in the approach to sex may cause conflict.

To relieve stress, participate in sports activities, practice tai chi, or take a yoga class.

8. Get plenty of sleep

Those with a hectic lifestyle don’t always have the time to get the right amount of sleep. Being busy also makes it difficult to make time for sex.

People who balance work with caring for aging parents or young children are often left exhausted, which can lead to a reduced sex drive.

Boost your energy and sex drive by taking naps when you can and eating a healthy diet high in protein and low in carbohydrates.

9. Keep your relationship in check

After you’ve had an argument with your partner, chances are you’re not in the mood to have sex. For women, sensing emotional closeness is important to sexual intimacy. That means unresolved conflicts can affect your sexual relationship.

Communication is essential for building trust. It’s important to prevent resentments from building up.

Consult a doctor

Even if you’re taking a natural approach to boosting your sex drive, it still might be a good idea to talk with your doctor. They can help you identify underlying problems.

Your doctor may suggest some strategies for enhancing sexual health.

These may include communicating with your partner, making healthy lifestyle choices, and treating underlying medical conditions. Knowing the root of the problem affecting your sex life will make it easier to find a solution.

10. Trial and error

There are a variety of different approaches that may enhance your sex drive naturally. However, it’s important to remember that every couple is different. It may take a little experimentation to find out what works best for you.

If you do decide to turn to prescription drugs, remember that desire is at the core of sex. It’s important to remember that a little blue pill may not be the answer if emotional issues are affecting your libido.

Healthline has strict sourcing guidelines and relies on peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions, and medical associations. We avoid using tertiary references. You can learn more about how we ensure our content is accurate and current by reading our editorial policy.

Get back in sexual sync

Get back in sexual sync

Here’s how to regain romantic rhythm with your partner when sexual drive and interest get out of whack.

Published: November, 2020

This article is a repost which originally appeared on Harvard Health

Edited for content

It’s common for longtime partners to fall into romantic ruts. “You don’t stay newlyweds for life, and there are times when romance and sex get routine and less exciting,” says Dr. Sharon Bober, director of the Sexual Health Program at Harvard-affiliated Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

What can you do when you and your partner are sexually out of sync? As with most things in life, if you want change, then you must be willing to change.

“This means giving your relationship the attention it needs,” says Dr. Bober. “You can’t leave everything on autopilot and wait for your relationship to eventually return to normal.”

Ups and downs

As couples age, they also face other challenges to intimacy. For instance, sexual drive varies between the sexes and can be more unpredictable.

Women go through menopause, which affects desire and can make sex uncomfortable. Men often deal with erectile dysfunction, which leads to worry about sexual performance and dampens libido.

But there are upsides to this period of life, too. The kids are out of the house, many couples are more financially secure, and they have more time to relax and enjoy each other.

The rules of attraction

Couples can get out of sexual sync when one or both partners feel that they are no longer attractive or sexually appealing, even though this is often not the case. “They may falsely believe they are not desirable and that in turn lowers their own feelings of sexuality,” says Dr. Sharon Bober, director of the Sexual Health Program at Harvard’s Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Make a regular effort to compliment your partner both physically and emotionally, and show that you still want a connection.

Making a new recipe

While erectile dysfunction medication and lubricants can help overcome some of the physical barriers to sex, older couples need to work together to correct an out-of-sync love life.

“There are many strategies that can help get intimacy back in rhythm,” says Dr. Bober. “But it’s like a recipe with multiple ingredients. They work best together.”

Here are some of her suggestions:

Restart the romance spark. A satisfying sex life begins outside the bedroom. “Don’t think of your partner as a roommate, but someone you want to bond with,” says Dr. Bober. Try something new together like a hobby or take a class or overnight trip. “Think about how you would woo your partner if you were dating for the first time,” says Dr. Bober.

Plan for intimacy. If motivation is a barrier, set up a sex date. Sometimes you need to make sex happen to get back in the rhythm, similar to scheduling workouts with a trainer. “This way neither partner needs to feel pressured to initiate, but rather together you can plan for and anticipate some romance with each other,” says Dr. Bober.

Find the best time. Energy levels vary throughout the day and night and per person. “Some people like morning romance, and others enjoy it in the evening,” says Dr. Bober. “Couples need to communicate with each other about what time of day is best and try to find a compromise.”

Don’t rush it. Arousal is not as spontaneous as you age. “Put more effort into anticipation and the overall experience of giving and receiving pleasure, which gives both people time for proper arousal and avoids the stress of having to get in the mood quickly,” says Dr. Bober.

Also, make foreplay central to sex. Spend more time hugging, kissing, and exploring each other’s bodies. “Bring back the actions that you found exciting when dating,” says Dr. Bober.

Build from desires. Before and during sex, ask your partner what feels good and what sparks interest. And then share what you like.

“This is a way to build mutual trust,” says Dr. Bober. Besides the physical aspect, desires also could include actions like reading something erotic to each other or watching a sexy movie.

Dr. Bober adds that what really counts is for couples to come together and focus on mutual pleasure.

“For any couple, the key to enhancing desire is communication and connection,” she says. “A little more of both is often great for boosting your sex life.”

#SexColumn: Men can lose their sex drive too

#SexColumn: Men can lose their sex drive too

Sep 25, 2020

By Sharon Gordon

This article is a repost which originally appeared on IOL

Edited for content

Every joke I’ve ever heard about lack of libido or not wanting to have sex has had a woman as the brunt. In reality many women report that their partners are more often than not the cause for a drop in sexual activity.

Men can also feel asexual, not enjoy sex and find themselves in a slump. The difference is nobody will admit to it or discuss it.

So let’s talk about the top 10 things that can kill your sex drive and your penis. Doctors often refer to ED (erectile dysfunction) as the first signs of early death. I don’t want to be alarmist but the penis and its ability to be erect is a fantastic gauge for health.

ED is the first sign that you may have one of the big three chronic conditions; hypertension, cardiac problems or diabetes. They are easy to diagnose and treatable and yet many men ignore the signs because they are reluctant to admit that their erections are not what they used to be.

One of the big drug companies talk about the 5 finger erection. Hold your hand out in front of you, fingers outstretched, thumb facing up and pinkie finger to the floor. It is the perfect explanation of erections through the ages. The thumb indicates the strength and height of a young adolescent male and the pinkie that of an older male. No cause for concern, as long as the penis is still hard.

It’s when the penis can no longer obtain an erection that you should see your doctor. A real doctor, not some quack that is going to just prescribe ways to achieve and erection. You should be treating the cause and not just the symptom.

There are other reasons why your erection isn’t what it should be. I’ve already alluded to diabetes. Sugar affects testosterone production, making it harder to get an erection. So slow down on eating all those sweets and chocolates.

Inadequate sleep also affects testosterone levels and in turn your erection. I know that this year has shot stress levels through the roof, affecting everything from sleep to nutrition. Be aware of it and if necessary get help. Exercise and mediation can help but drugs may be necessary in acute cases.

Which brings me to exercise. Too much exercise, especially running and cycling could be doing more harm than good. British Columbia University did a study that alleges that more than 64km per week can drop testosterone levels by 17%.

I wonder if erections were stronger during the lockdown when alcohol was not available for sale. Alcohol consumption has a major impact on erections and inability to orgasm. Alcohol also affects testosterone levels.

I keep going on about the hormone testosterone. This is the libido driving hormone and without it your sex drive will tank. Men often lack enough testosterone. It is a simple blood test and is very easily treated. So if you feel something is off, get it tested. I know so many men who would rather bite the bullet than spend an hour at the doctor and get it sorted.

If you are spending too much time indoors you ay also be lowering testosterone production. You do need Vitamin D for production to happen. So why not take yourself out for a day in the outdoors. I have recently discovered that in and around Johannesburg there is plenty to do.

I have some bad news for the lactose intolerant and vegans. Harvard Medical School alleges a direct connection between Soy intake and erectile dysfunction. So if you have recently changed your diet to soy based foods and have been experiencing erectile issues, try cutting out the soy.

Every one of these causes can be addressed and I am by no means suggesting that these are the only causes for your penis not working as well as it should. My absolute opinion is that if it’s not working as well as it should seek medical assistance. There is no reason to be ashamed or embarrassed. Most women have their breasts and vaginas examined annually to ensure continued sexual health and men should get into the habit of doing the same.

In the interim, while you are sorting out the causes there are some adult toys that can help out in the play department. Penis pumps can help draw blood into the penis and thus help with a better erection. Once blood is in the penis use a simple cock ring to keep the blood there for the duration of play. Remove it before it becomes uncomfortable and no longer than 20 minutes.

For a little extra vooma, use a vibrating cock ring. You will maintain your erection and become a vibrator in one go. If your erection doesn’t work at all anymore, you can use a hollow strap on. The penis is placed inside the strap on and is then used to pleasure your partner the same way an erection would. Also remember that your mouth and hands can offer just as much pleasure when used correctly.

13 health benefits of sex

13 health benefits of sex

Medically reviewed words Rosie Saunders, Dr Louise Wiseman MBBS, BSc (Hons), DRCOG, MRCGP

·10-min read

This article is a repost which originally appeared on yahoo!style

Edited for content

Not only does a healthy sex life boost levels of intimacy, affection and wellbeing in your relationship, according to science, but it’s also great for your physical and mental health.

And while we all know between-the-sheets action is a calorie burner – it can torch through calories equivalent to a 30-minute jog – there are so many great health benefits of sex that go way beyond energy expenditure.

With Tracey Cox, sex and relationships educator, and Mia Sabat, in-house sex therapist at Emjoy, we run through 13 evidence-backed health benefits of sex – plus, tips for fostering a healthy sex life:

13 health benefits of sex

Sex can be beneficial to your health in many ways, from boosting your immune function to reducing your risk of heart disease and supercharging your self-esteem. Here, we run through 13 evidence-based health benefits of sex, according to science:

1. Sex helps you sleep

During climax, the brain releases a hormone called oxytocin, which induces a relaxed feeling that helps you sleep better. ‘Great sex is one of the best cures for sleeplessness and insomnia – oxytocin is the hormone that promotes feelings of intimacy, and it jumps to five times its normal level during climax,’ says Cox. ‘It also makes you feel sleepy. While men drift off two to five minutes after orgasm, women usually take 20 to 30 minutes.’

2. Sex makes you look younger

Couples who have sex at least three times a week look more than 10 years younger than those who get frisky less often, according to research by Dr David Weeks, clinical neuropsychologist at the Royal Edinburgh Hospital. He adds, the pleasure from having sex is a ‘crucial factor’ in staying young. Additionally, having sex boosts blood circulation and causes your body to release endorphins, giving your skin a natural glow. Human Growth hormone (HGH) somatotropin is also released, which improves skin elasticity and fends off wrinkles.

3. Sex reduces headaches

Sex can be a powerful painkiller, especially for headache sufferers. A study carried out by the University of Munster in Germany found that sex can actually be more effective than painkillers when it comes to reducing headache pain. This is because sex triggers the release of endorphins – the body’s natural painkillers – into the central nervous system. The effect is so powerful, their research shows, that more than half of people who have sex during a headache experience an improvement in symptoms.

Some headaches occur as a result of sexual activity and this should be discussed with your doctor.

4. Sex relieves stress

Given that so many mood-boosting chemicals are released during sex, it makes sense that getting frisky can act as a natural, powerful stress-reliever. In one rodent study, having sex daily for a fortnight caused cell growth in the hippocampus, the part of the brain that keeps stress levels under control. And in a similar human study, people who had daily intercourse for two weeks experienced a reduction in stress-related blood pressure.

5. Sex promotes healthier food choices

Believe it or not, sex can help to curb sugar and fat cravings. How? By lowering levels of the stress hormone cortisol, which stimulates fat and carbohydrate metabolism for fast energy, promotes insulin release and impacts blood sugar levels. This trifecta of actions not only boosts your appetite, but leads you to crave sweet, high-fat foods, which are typically lower in nutrients.

6. Sex boosts immunity

Research from Wilkes-Barre University found that the intimacy of sex stimulates the body to produce Immunoglobulin A (IgA), an antibody that forms a barrier against a cold. People who have sex more than once or twice a week, they found, have more of these antibodies than those who are less sexually active. Obviously in the unusual context of covid – awareness of symptoms of infection is important in making decisions about intimacy.

7. Sex eases period pain

At the moment of climax, the uterine muscles contract and send pain-relieving and mood-enhancing endorphins to the brain. These act as a natural painkiller, and help to ease menstrual cramps, depression and irritability associated with PMS. The muscle contractions that occur when you orgasm may also help to relieve tension in your uterus, providing relief from cramps.

8. Sex reduces prostate cancer risk

The prostate is important in the male reproductive system – it produces the alkaline components of semen, which help to protect the sperm. Research from Harvard found that men who ejaculate on a regular basis – defined as five times or more each week – are less likely to develop prostate cancer.

9. Sex boosts heart health

The less frequently you have sex, the higher your risk of heart disease, according to an observational study spanning more than 1,000 men published in the American Journal of Cardiology. Compared to men who reported having sex a minimum of two or three times per week, men with sexual activity of once per month or less were 45 per cent more likely to be diagnosed with cardiovascular disease.

10. Sex increases self-esteem

Having sex can help boost self-confidence and develop a more better positive attitude about yourself. ‘Never underestimate the power of confidence,’ says Sabat. ‘Expressing what you want clearly and without fear is one of the most desirable things you can do, especially while being intimate with another person. Love the power of your body and acknowledge that you deserve to experience pleasure. Doing this will help you to communicate with more clarity and confidence.’

11. Sex boosts libido

The more frequently you have sex, the more likely you are to want to do it again. This is because getting frisky prompts your brain to release dopamine, a neurotransmitter involved in the motivation and reward process. And among women specifically, sex boosts estrogen levels and blood flow, which increases the desire for sex.

12. Sex improves memory

Getting intimate may boost your brain function by stimulating areas of the brain that are associated with memory. In a long-term study by the University of Wollongong, frequent sexual activity was found to be associated with better performance in a short-term memory test. This research is supported by the findings of a study by Manchester University, which revealed that sexually active adults have better brain power.

13. Sex enhances sperm quality

Ejaculating every day for seven days improves men’s sperm quality by reducing the amount of DNA damage, according to research by the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. As well as seeing ‘substantial and statistically highly significant’ changes in the quality of the sperm, ‘in addition, we found that although frequent ejaculation decreased semen volume and sperm concentrations, it did not compromise sperm motility and, in fact, this rose slightly but significantly,’ said lead author Dr David Greening.

10 tips for a healthy sex life

Having regular sex may bring about a variety of health benefits, but being able to communicate and experience sexual satisfaction is key to making the experience pleasurable. Here, we run through 10 tips for a healthy sex life:

1. Connect with self-pleasure

Make time to get to know yourself – self pleasure is still a form of sex. ‘Every sexual experience begins within ourselves, and masturbation embodies this experience,’ says Sabat. ‘Beyond stimulating our sex drive, self-pleasure allows us to connect with our minds and bodies to focus on our desires and sexuality. This helps us to better communicate our needs and preferences, and ultimately engage in a more fulfilling sexual experience.’

2. Talk to your partner

Talk openly with your partner before entering the bedroom to establish consent, work out what you are both comfortable with, and what you’d like to explore, Sabat recommends. ‘Not only is consent always key, but ensuring you talk openly about your preferences gives everyone involved time to decide if they do, or do not, want to explore a specific type of sexual activity,’ she says.

3. Learn about erogenous zones

An erogenous zone is an area of the body that has heightened sensitivity, which may elicit a sexual response when stimulated. ‘Everyone has unique parts of their body which they love being touched, or gain arousal from,’ says Sabat. ‘You’d be surprised where you can find them – but the best places to start are often sensitive areas like the lips, neck and breasts.’

4. Bring erotica into the bedroom

To spice things up, why not talk to your partner about exploring different kinds of erotica together? ‘I recommend couples engage with audio erotica because, when listening, each individual can engage with their own fantasies, preferences and turn-ons, while still connecting over the same storyline or narrative,’ says Sabat.

5. Explore your biggest organ

Your skin, of course! ‘The skin is a highly responsive organ, and finding new ways to stimulate it can be very arousing,’ says Sabat. ‘Consider investing in new materials that will play on your sense of touch. This could be anything from leather and silk to latex or sensory lubricants. Just be careful of any allergies and introduce objects to both of your bodies in a responsible way.’

6. Try a new location

Sex doesn’t have to stay between the sheets, says Sabat. ‘Next time you’re feeling more adventurous, try taking it to the kitchen, bathroom, or even the hallway – these new locations will mean you have to work out new positions while enjoying the excitement of a new situation,’ she says.

7. Grab a toy

Sex toys can be used to complement both penetrative and oral sex throughout your experience – and they don’t need to be focused on penetration to create pleasure, says Sabat. ‘If your partner is open to bringing items like leashes, feathers, whips, and bondage toys such as handcuffs into the bedroom, bringing toys that focus on stimulating external areas into the bedroom can often lead to a more fulfilling sexual experience,’ she adds.

8. Engage with your fantasies

We all have fantasies, Sabat says, so it’s important to embrace them without shame. ‘Not only do fantasies increase sexual desire and arousal, but they let us explore facets of our sexuality that can often be forgotten or neglected,’ she says. ‘In fact, they can even help you to become more creative in the bedroom. While not every fantasy should be acted upon, discussing the parts of the fantasy that make you most excited with your partner can lead to healthy conversations about your sexual needs.’

9. Try different positions

Inject a sense of adventure into your bedroom antics by trying out different positions. ‘We often fall back on techniques that we know will result in orgasm – be it specific types of stimulation, favourite positions, or repeating the same moves over and over again,’ says Sabat. ‘Trying new positions helps us to experience intimacy in different ways. Explore new angles by using pillows, or mix things up by switching roles – if you’d normally be in control or on top, why not let your partner take the reins?’

10. Communication is key

Every sexual encounter is different, even if it’s happening with the same person, says Sabat. ‘What matters is that you learn your partner’s preferences and desires, and focus on communicating what you do and do not like,’ she explains. ‘Not only will this lead to more pleasure for you both, but it helps us reject the stigma that one partner is responsible for the other’s pleasure. Remember that sex is a shared experience, with shared responsibility. Communicate with your partner, feel empowered by your desires and let go.’

Last updated: 10-09-2020

Men: Ageing and Sexual Health Myths

Men: Ageing and Sexual Health Myths

[email protected] (healthxchange.sg)
Health Xchange4 September 2020

This article is a repost which originally appeared on Yahoo SG

In conjunction with World Sexual Health Day (4 Sep 2020), the departments of Psychiatry and Urology from Singapore General Hospital (SGH), a member of the SingHealth group, help dispel common myths about male ageing and sexual health.

Top 5 myths on male ageing and sexual health

Myth 1: Is something wrong with me as my friends don’t seem to have complaints about their erections?

Fact: Every man’s erection becomes weaker with age. However, men with medical conditions like diabetes, hypertension and high cholesterol may experience erectile dysfunction earlier in their lives.

Myth 2: A short penis is not good for sex.

Fact: Many men have this misconception that good sex requires a long penis. Procedures to lengthen the penis are merely cosmetic and do not enhance erection. In fact, they may even impair erections in some cases!

Myth 3: Is not being able to have multiple erections a problem?

Fact: Most men do not have multiple erections. After ejaculation, the penis will have a refractory period whereby it cannot become erect.

Myth 4: Using erection drugs will improve my sex life.

Fact: Erection drugs do not increase sex drive. They increase blood flow in the penis, allowing erections to be stronger and more rigid.

Myth 5: It is possible to die from taking erection drugs.

Fact: Deaths from erection drugs are very rare and they happen when the drugs are taken without medical supervision. Victims may also have underlying medical conditions like heart problems. When taken properly under medical supervision, erection drugs are actually very safe.​

Treatment for erectile dysfunction

The most common treatment for erectile dysfunction is taking drugs such as Viagra, Levitra or Cialis under medical supervision. The most drastic treatment is a surgical procedure which involves inserting a penile implant.

Reduced libido caused by a lack of testosterone can be confirmed with a blood test and treated with testosterone supplements. The treatment can be given in an oral form or via a series of injections, with regular follow-ups to ensure that the patient’s testosterone is replaced adequately and safely.

Prevention is better than treatment

That is why it is important to maintain a well-balanced lifestyle – physically, emotionally and financially – as it is the first step towards graceful ageing and a healthy sex life.

If you have any chronic medical problems such as diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and depression, they need to be managed well so as to prevent long-term complications.

Experts warn against drug and alcohol abuse as these have a toxic effect on the nervous system, damaging nerves that are critical to sexual desire. Smoking causes early atherosclerosis (which leads to premature erectile dysfunction and is also associated with heart attacks, strokes and many cancers) and should be avoided.

Exercising regularly will also help improve your self image (which increases desire and boosts sexual hormones) and promote healthy blood vessels (which means delaying the onset of erectile dysfunction).

On the emotional front, focus on relationships with important people in your life and let go of past grievances. Also, be mentally and financially prepared for retirement. If one enters the golden years possessing financial stability, companionship and meaningful hobbies, one will be well equipped to lead a more fulfilling life in the later years.

 

Rogaine and Low Libido: What Are the Facts?

Learn the Facts About Rogaine and Low Libido

Medically reviewed by Harshil Matta, DO — Written by Kimberly Holland — Updated on August 13, 2020

This article is a repost which originally appeared on HealthLine

Edited for content

What is Rogaine?

In an effort to reverse or disguise hair loss, many men reach for over-the-counter hair loss treatments. One of the most popular, minoxidil (Rogaine), poses a variety of potential risks.

Rogaine has been available for several decades. The medication is available at pharmacies and drugstores nationwide. It’s also available as a prescription from your doctor.

Rogaine is a topical treatment intended to promote hair growth. It can also be used to slow hair loss.

However, Rogaine is not intended to stop balding or correct receding hairlines. When you stop using Rogaine, new hair growth will likely be lost within a few weeks or months.

How is Rogaine used?

Rogaine comes in two forms:

  • a liquid you apply directly to your scalp
  • a tablet you take by mouth

Follow your pharmacist or doctor’s instructions carefully.

Using more than prescribed will not yield better or faster results. Visible results may not appear for several months to more than a year.

What are Rogaine’s side effects?

Using Rogaine increases your risk for several side effects. These side effects include:

  • scalp sensitivity
  • skin dryness
  • skin flaking
  • irritation or burning sensation at and around the application site
  • increased heart rate

Using Rogaine may also make your skin more sensitive to sunlight. Avoid direct sunlight and wear protective clothing, sunscreen, and sunglasses when outside.

Rogaine and erectile dysfunction

To date, no scientific studies have made a connection between Rogaine and sexual dysfunction.

Men who take Rogaine and experience problems with libido, erection, or performance will often find another contributing factor that explains their symptoms.

One study published in 2014 found that Rogaine had an effect on the activity of androgen receptors, but the authors are very clear in stating that the effects are in the hair follicle only.

Currently, there’s still no confirmed evidence that Rogaine negatively affects the male libido, although research continues.

Newer treatments, such as finasteride (Proscar, Propecia), have also been introduced to the market.

Propecia was hailed as a less messy alternative to Rogaine. People who use that drug only have to take a pill once a day by mouth.

An early study involving men who used finasteride and complained of side effects found that sexual dysfunction was the most common, particularly libido and erectile dysfunction.

Other well-conducted research studies display side effects in much lower numbers of all users of finasteride. Those effects are usually reversible once the medication is stopped.

Those same men reported that their number of sexual encounters fell during and after use. Unfortunately, those side effects are long-lasting.

Men in the study experienced these unwanted side effects for an average of 40 months after stopping the medication.

When to call your doctor

If you’re interested in regrowing hair or slowing hair loss, speak with your doctor about your options. If you begin taking a medication for hair loss, remember to keep track of any side effects and complications.

Should you begin experiencing side effects, tell your doctor. Detail what you’re experiencing and how quickly the symptoms began after you started the medication.

Be sure to also tell your doctor about any other medications, supplements, and vitamins you’re taking. A combination of certain medications and chemicals can potentially cause problems.

Helping your doctor identify any possible complications will help to manage side effects before they become severe.

Lastly, if you begin having sexual performance problems or issues with dysfunction, see your doctor. The change in sexual performance may have nothing to do with your Rogaine use.

Working with your doctor will ensure you find a cause for your sexual problem and a lasting solution.

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