Reducing The Risk Of Erectile Dysfunction With Nutrition

Reducing The Risk Of Erectile Dysfunction With Nutrition

Posted on Jun 01, 2020, 4 p.m.

This article is a repost which originally appeared on WORLDHEALTH.NET

Edited for content

At some point in their lives most men will struggle with penile health issues, when it comes to this these issues involve more than erections, ejaculations, and reproduction as poor penile health can be a sign of an underlying health condition.

Additionally issues that affect the penis can also impact other areas of your life including emotionally and socially. Bottom line is that routine maintenance in this area can also help to ensure optimum performance which includes managing stress, getting enough sleep, being physically active, and following a healthy well balanced diet. According to research from Harvard University men should masturbate (routine maintenance) 21 times a month to reduce the odds of prostate cancer by 33%.

Simply masturbating 21+ times a month is not enough to guarantee to avoid prostate cancer, but added to a healthy diet full of organic produce, getting enough sleep, managing stress, being active and exercising, this will go a long way. Ian Kerner, PhD,  recommends a plant based diet and incorporating plenty of fish rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, as well as “consuming red foods such as tomatoes that are rich in lycopene, as well as soy products that contain isoflavones, along with getting regular physicals that include a prostate exam, and plenty of exercise.

Diet and nutrition play a bigger part in health than most people understand, and this includes penile health. Certain types of food have been shown to affect penis health, for example studies have shown that diets rich in flavonoids, which occur naturally in fruits, vegetables and whole grains, are associated with a reduced risk of erectile dysfunction in men under the age of 70.

There are many things that can affect an erection like poor health, smoking, and certain medications. Following a sub par diet, how much you eat, and how often you eat can affect your mood, energy levels, blood flow, and hormones which are all very important to your sex life.

It stands to reason that if certain foods can boost your erection, keep sperm healthy, and boost testosterone levels then eating habits exist that can also kill your libido. Unhealthy fats and added sugars can exacerbate erectile issues, and lower testosterone levels. Alcohol is a depressant which can numb the feeling of sexual stimulation, alter the blood flow in/out of the penis, and decrease testosterone levels sapping libido, energy, and moods.

Achieving and maintaining an erection requires good blood flow and plenty of nitric oxide. Flavonoids have been shown to improve cardiovascular health by helping to increase blood flow and the concentration of nitric oxide in the blood. Dark chocolate is rich in flavonoids, other choices include tea, citrus fruits, berries, apples, legumes, onions, tomatoes, broccoli, tea, grapes, celery, red peppers, ginger, red cabbage, asparagus, and leafy greens.

Pistachios are good for more than a snack, a study published in the International Journal of Impotence Research suggests that consuming these nuts for several weeks improved several parameters of ED including improved International Index of Erectile function scores, improved cholesterol levels and improved blood pressure with no notable side effects being observed.

Watermelon may help to improve sexual function as a study from Texas A&M University found connections between ED and watermelon, suggesting that citrulline found in watermelon helped to relax blood vessels and improved blood flow in a similar manner as to medications for ED.

Bananas are a great source of potassium which is great for keeping the heart and circulation strong. Potassium also keeps blood pressure in check by stabilizing sodium levels. Bananas are also a rich source of vitamin B which helps to increase energy levels, and combat stress that can lead to erectile dysfunction.

Salmon is a great source of omega-3 fatty acids which can help to enhance blood flow and enhance erectile function by helping to relax your arteries easing the way for blood to flow to the entire body without exception, including your penis. Salmon also contains vitamin D, selenium and magnesium which are all required to support testosterone levels and healthy sperm.

Anthocyanins are great for cardiovascular health, cherries are loaded with anthocyanins, which are flavonoids, that help to protect your artery walls and help prevent fatty plaques from forming in the arteries ensuring good blood flow and circulation.

Soluble fiber such as that in oatmeal has been shown to be great for satiety, fighting inflammation, to lower cholesterol levels and helps to keep your blood vessels smooth, healthy and stretchy, which also can apply to penis health.

Cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli can help to combat cancer, and the high vitamin C content helps to boost blood circulation and it has been linked to an improved libido. Cruciferous veggies such as bok choy, cabbage, and Brussels sprouts also contain glucobrassicins which help to clear the body of excess oestrogen which may help to boost your sex drive.

The antioxidant phytochemical resveratrol helps to open arteries by enhancing the production of nitric oxide, production of nitric oxide allows blood vessels to expand, and increases blood flow. Resveratrol works by expanding the tiny and main arteries in the penis much like medications for ED. It also helps to block enzymes that trigger the body to push away testosterone, which will help maintain high levels of the hormone and strong erections that should last well beyond foreplay.

After reaching the age of 30 testosterone levels begin to decrease, fortunately there are simple diet fixes that may help you, and because your brain, heart and penis are all intimately connected this is also good for your overall health and well being. Aging also affects your penis, as a result many men experience erectile difficulties, if you are one of them please consult with your physician as it can be an indication of an underlying condition that shouldn’t be ignored. Your physician can work with you to help determine the cause and work towards a solution, often lifestyle changes can help.

Male Sexual Worries: Trends in the Post-Viagra Age

Male Sexual Worries: Trends in the Post-Viagra Age

This article is a repost which originally appeared on SciTechDaily

Edited for content

Trends in reasons for visiting a the San Raffaele sexual health clinic. Credit: This diagram appears with the permission of the authors and the International Journal of Impotence Research. The EAU thanks the authors, and the journal for their cooperation.

Scientists report a change in why men seek help for sexual problems, with fewer men complaining about impotence (erectile dysfunction) and premature ejaculation, and more men, especially younger men, complaining about low sexual desire and curvature of the penis (Peyronie’s disease).

Presenting the work at the European Association of Urology (virtual) Congress, after recent acceptance for publication, research leader Dr. Paolo Capogrosso (San Raffaele Hospital, Milan, Italy) said:

“Over a 10 year period we have seen a real change in what concerns men when they attend sexual health clinics. This is probably driven by greater openness, and men now accepting that many sexual problems can be treated, rather than being something they don’t want to talk about.”

The success of erectile dysfunction treatments such as Viagra and Cialis, and the availability of new treatments, means that men facing sexual problems have now have treatments for sexual problems which weren’t available a generation ago. Now researchers at San Raffaele Hospital in Milan have studied why men come to sexual health clinics, and how this has changed over a 10-year period.

In what is believed to be the first research of its kind, the scientists questioned 3244 male visitors to the San Raffaele Hospital Sexual Health Clinic in Milan over a 10 year period (2009 to 2019), and classified the main reason for the visit. They found that the number of patients visiting with erectile dysfunction problems increased from 2009 to 2013, then started to decrease.

There were comparatively few patients complaining of low sex drive or Peyronie’s disease in 2009, but complaints about both of these conditions grow from 2009 to the end of the study. In 2019 men were around 30% more likely to report Peyronie’s disease than in 2009, and around 32% more likely to report low sexual desire.

The amount of men complaining of premature ejaculation dropped by around 6% over the 10-year period. The average age of first attendance at the clinical also dropped, from a mean of 61 to 53 years.

“Erectile dysfunction is still the main reason for attending the clinic, but this number is dropping, whereas around 35% of men attending the clinic now complain of Peyronie’s disease, and that number has shown steady growth,” said Paolo Capogrosso. “Our patients are also getting younger, which may reflect a generational change in attitude to sexual problems.”

Dr. Capogrosso continued “We need to be clear about what these figures mean. They do not indicate any change in the prevalence of these conditions, what they show is why men came to the clinic. In other words, it shows what they are concerned about. The changes probably also reflect the availability of treatments; as treatments for sexual conditions have become available over the last few years, men are less likely to suffer in silence.”

These are results from a single centre, so they need to be confirmed by more inclusive studies. “Nevertheless there seems to be a growing awareness of conditions such as Peyronie’s disease, with articles appearing in the popular press*. In addition, we know that the awareness of this condition is increasing in the USA and elsewhere, so this may be a general trend,**” said Dr. Capogrosso.

Commenting, Dr Mikkel Fode (Associate Professor of Urology at University of Copenhagen), said:

“Although these data are somewhat preliminary as they stem from single institution they are interesting because they allow us to formulate several hypotheses. For example the drop in men presenting with erectile dysfunction may mean that family physicians are becoming more comfortable addressing this issue and that the patients are never referred to specialized centers. Likewise, the simultaneous drop in age at presentation and increase in Peyronie’s disease and low sex drive could indicate that both men and their partners are becoming more mindful to optimizing their sex lives. I will be very interesting to see if these trends are also present in other centers around the world.”

Dr. Fode was not involved in this work, this is an independent comment.

References:

* “Trends in reported male sexual dysfunction over the past decade: an evolving landscape” by Edoardo Pozzi, Paolo Capogrosso, Luca Boeri, Walter Cazzaniga, Rayan Matloob, Eugenio Ventimiglia, Davide Oreggia, Nicolò Schifano, Luigi Candela, Costantino Abbate, Francesco Montorsi and Andrea Salonia, 1 July 2020, International Journal of Impotence Research.

** “The Prevalence of Peyronie’s Disease in the United States: A Population-Based Study” by Mark Stuntz, Anna Perlaky, Franka des Vignes, Tassos Kyriakides and Dan Glass, 23 February 2016, PLOS ONE.
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0150157
PMCID: PMC4764365

PRP for Erectile Dysfunction: Research, Benefits, and Risks

Can PRP Treat Erectile Dysfunction? Research, Benefits, and Side Effects

Medically reviewed by Kevin O. Hwang, MD, MPH — Written by Daniel Yetman on March 6, 2020

This article is a repost which originally appeared on Healthline

Edited for content

What is PRP?

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a component of blood that’s thought to promote healing and tissue generation. PRP therapy is used to treat tendon or muscle injuries, stimulate hair growth, and speed recovery from surgery.

It’s also used as an experimental or alternative treatment option for:

  • erectile dysfunction (ED)
  • Peyronie’s disease
  • penis enlargement
  • sexual performance

There’s currently little research on the effectiveness of PRP for ED. In this article, we’re going to break down what scientists have found so far. We’ll also look at alternative treatment options and potential side effects of PRP therapy.

How does it work?

Your blood is made of four different components: red blood cells, white blood cells, plasma, and platelets.

Plasma is the liquid part of your blood and makes up about half of its volume. Platelets are critical for helping your blood clot after an injury. They also contain proteins called growth factors that help speed up healing.

The theoretical benefit of PRP for ED is to make the tissue and blood vessels in the penis healthier.

To prepare PRP, a medical professional takes a small sample of your blood and spins it in a machine called a centrifuge. The centrifuge separates the plasma and platelets from the other parts of your blood.

The resulting PRP mixture has a much higher concentration of platelets than regular blood. Once the PRP is developed, it’s injected into your penis. This is called the Priapus Shot, or P-Shot.

The P-Shot is a quick procedure, and you’ll likely be able to leave the clinic in about an hour. You also don’t have to do anything to prepare in advance for the procedure.

What does the research say?

Many clinics offering PRP for ED claim that it’s effective, but there’s limited scientific evidence to support their claims. Using PRP for ED is experimental, and its effectiveness is still under review.

A 2020 review looked at all the research available to date on PRP therapy for male sexual dysfunction. The review looked at three animal studies and two human studies for ED. The studies didn’t report any major adverse reactions to PRP therapy.

The researchers concluded that PRP has the potential to be a useful treatment option for ED. However, it’s important to keep in mind that the studies had small sample sizes, and there weren’t adequate comparison groups.

More research is needed to understand the benefits of PRP treatment. The current evidence is mostly anecdotal.

How does PRP compare to other ED treatments?

At this time, it isn’t clear if undergoing PRP therapy will help improve symptoms of ED. Traditional treatment options might be a better alternative until more research is available.

Many people with ED have success with traditional treatment options, which usually target the underlying cause of ED. Your doctor can evaluate you for potential causes of ED, such as heart disease, high cholesterol, or diabetes, and recommend the best treatment option for you.

Common ED treatments include:

  • Medications. ED medications allow the blood vessels in the penis to relax and increase blood flow.
  • Lifestyle changes. Becoming more physically active, eating a healthier diet, and quitting smoking all have the potential to improve ED.
  • Talk therapy. Talk therapies might help improve ED if it’s a result of psychological causes, such as anxiety, stress, or relationship problems.
  • Targeting underlying conditions. ED is often caused by an underlying condition, such as high blood pressure, obesity, and heart disease. Treating these conditions has the potential to improve erection quality.
How much does PRP cost?

Few insurance plans currently cover PRP because it’s still considered an experimental treatment. The cost of the P-Shot can range widely among clinics. According to the Hormone Zone, the P-Shot procedure costs about $1,900. However, some clinics may charge up to $2,200 for treatment.

According to the 2018 Plastic Surgery Statistics Report, the average doctor fee for a PRP procedure was $683, not including facility and instrument cost.

Finding a doctor

If you’re interested in having PRP treatment for ED, talk to your doctor. They can answer your questions about PRP and refer you to a specialist who performs the treatment. Globally, there are at least 683 registered clinics that can administer PRP for ED.

PRP is usually performed by a doctor or surgeon. However, laws on who can perform the treatment may vary between countries.

When looking for somebody to perform PRP, check their medical credentials to make sure they’re licensed by a medical board before you make an appointment.

If possible, you may also want to speak to one of their previous clients to see if they were happy with their results.

Risks and side effects

The 2020 review mentioned earlier found no major adverse effects in the study participants. However, researchers can’t say whether or not PRP is a safe treatment for ED until more research comes out.

As of now, there have been few clinical trials, and the sample sizes have been too small to make any conclusions.

PRP is unlikely to cause an allergic reaction since the substance being injected is coming from your body. However, as with any type of injection, there’s always a risk of complications, such as:

  • infection
  • nerve damage
  • pain, including pain at the injection site
  • tissue damage
  • bruising
Takeaway

PRP therapy is still an experimental treatment. At this time, it isn’t clear if PRP can help treat ED. The procedure is relatively expensive and isn’t covered by most insurance companies.

Early research looks promising, but until studies with large sample sizes and control groups come out, you may want to stick with traditional ED treatments.

If you’re having trouble getting an erection, it’s a good idea to talk to your doctor. They can test you for underlying medical conditions that may be causing ED and recommend an appropriate treatment.

Keto diet found to boost sperm count and quality in obese men – Insider

The keto weight loss diet could help boost sperm count and quality, according to 2 case reports

Gabby Landsverk
Sep 10, 2020, 6:00 PM

This article is a repost which originally appeared on Insider

Edited for content

  • Two new case reports suggest a keto weight loss diet could benefit sperm count and quality in obese men.
  • Two patients who lost 20 to 60 pounds on the diet saw dramatic improvements in their sperm samples.
  • This is backed by evidence that keto can boost sexual health, but other healthy eating plans like a Mediterranean or DASH diet are also linked to improvements.

There’s new evidence that the high-fat, low carb keto diet might have benefits for reproductive health.

In new case reports, two men with obesity who lost weight on a very low calorie keto diet saw significant improvements in both sperm count and quality, according to research from the Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil, presented at the 2020 European and International Obesity Congress,

In the first case, the patient lost nearly 60 pounds in the three-month dieting period, dropping his body fat percentage from 42% to 34%. Subsequently, his sperm quality improved by nearly 100%, based on the percentage of motile sperm in a test sample. His testosterone levels also more than doubled.

The second case report was of a patient who lost less weight, 20 pounds in three months, dropping from 26% to 21% body fat. His sperm quality also improved, but he saw even more significant benefits to sperm count, with over 100 million more sperm tested in the final sample, an increase of nearly 30%. Interestingly, his testosterone levels decreased slightly.

These results were based on the dieting plan called Pronokal, a highly-studied commercial weight loss method launched in Spain in 2004, which differs from traditional keto in that it’s both low-carb (fewer than 50 grams a day) but also limited to 800 calories a day.

Two patients is hardly a large enough sample size to draw broader conclusions about keto and sperm count. But existing evidence supports the notion that low-carb diets could have benefits for sexual health, as increasing fat consumption appears to support healthy sperm levels.

Previous research has also linked higher levels of dietary fat intake to increased testosterone.

You may not need a strict diet to improve sexual health

One caveat to these findings is that extremely restrictive diets can have side effects, particularly in the long term, and very low calorie diets in particular should only be done with medical supervision.

It’s also not only the keto diet specifically that’s linked to better sperm count, quality, and other measures of fertility. There’s evidence healthy dietary changes of any sort can boost sexual health.

The Mediterranean diet, for instance, has been linked to improvements in erectile dysfunction. In a 2004 study, a healthy diet and exercise program helped improve erectile dysfunction in obese men.

A 2019 study found eating processed foods was linked to poor sperm count, while eating more fish and veggies was linked to better sperm count, which is also related to sex drive and overall sexual function.

The DASH diet, which limits red meat and full-fat dairy in favor of fruits, veggies and whole grains, is also linked to higher sperm count, according to research.

That suggests that the benefits may be less related to any one dietary pattern, such as keto, and more about improvements to overall health that affect every area of the body.

 

A Doctor with Hard Flaccid – Updates and Advice

A Doctor with Hard Flaccid – Updates and Advice

by Romero MD

Original post: A Doctor with Hard Flaccid – Updates and Advice

Hi everyone I am 26 years old and I recently developed this mythical problem called Hard Flaccid.
I am a medical doctor. I finished medical school a few months ago, and I am currently applying for Obstetrics-Gynecology.

First, my story. I have been practicing PE, intermittently, for the past 4-5 years. Basically, only manual stretches (I am satisfied with my girth), but, like many others, I think my injury was caused by Edging and excessive Kegeling, which I have been practicing for over 10 years, for stamina training and erection quality.

And without knowing the extreme importance of Reverse Kegeling. Every time I have sex, I also do intense kegels, in order to last 60-90 minutes of penetration. I know, I know… maybe it’s a little too much… But my girlfriend and I have always liked long love sessions Almost 2 months ago, while I was having sex with my girlfriend, I started to lose my erection suddenly, after performing an intense Kegel, during a sex position that placed my penis at a downward angle (so, I did a “very weighted Kegel”).

I thought I might have torn a muscle or ligament, and we stopped at that moment. The next day, I woke up with a hyper contracted and cold penis. As it didn’t seem to be a penile fracture, nor did I have any skin lesions, hemorrhages or bruises, I decided to simply rest. Because I thought that any fellow urologist would tell me to simply do the same – to rest.

After two weeks of online research, I discovered my diagnosis – Hard Flaccid/CPPS. However, I only have/had symptoms related to the anterior/superficial pelvic floor (Ischiocavernosus and Bulbocavernosus Muscles). I don’t have pelvic pain, difficulty passing stools or other posterior/deep pelvic floor symptoms. But I have/had:

– Sudden erectile dysfunction (9-10/10 to 4/10)
– Sudden premature ejaculation (90min to 3-5min)
– Hyper contracted penis (Hard Flaccid). Which improves sitting, lying down, with Reverse Kegels and with heat; and worsens standing, with physical activity, with Kegels and with Involuntary Kegels
– Cold and soft glans (sometimes scrotum and penis too)
– Mild urinary retention
– Loss of morning and spontaneous erections
– Slight bend of the penis to the left, from the base of the shaft. (IC injury?)
– Slight downward curvature of the penis, from the middle of the penis (BC injury?)
– And a slight twist of the entire shaft, clockwise (IC injury?)

The next day, I visited the Urology Department at my hospital. I was observed by 4 urologists. As expected, none of them had ever heard of Hard Flaccid… After explaining the whole story, situation and symptoms, I was medicated with:

– Ibuprofen (anti-inflammatory), for 7 days
– Cyclobenzaprine (muscle relaxant), for 30 days
– Tamsulosin (alpha blocker, to decrease all sympathetic nervous activity, stressful or non-stressful, to the pelvic floor), for 30 days
– Total sexual abstinence (masturbation and sex), for 30 days, which I was already doing for 2 weeks.
After these 30 days, I will have an appointment with one of the best Andrologist in my country, which will be on August 27

So, after 3 weeks, I have been doing a lot of research (books, websites, forums) … And, according to my symptoms, I am almost sure that I had/have a strain of the Left IC Muscle (and maybe the Left and/or Right BC), which is, consequently, contracting the anterior/superficial pelvic floor and the penile smooth muscle (giving rise to the Hard Flaccid and the shortening of the penis, while it is erect) and, consequently, compressing the pudendal nerve, dorsal nerve and pudendal arteries, giving rise to all the other symptoms.

And that’s why REVERSE KEGELS are so important for the progressive relief of all the symptoms.

Treatments. What I have done to recover:
– Ibuprofen, Cyclobenzaprine, Tamsulosin
– Extraordinary healthy eating (Proteins, vegetables and fruits. Very important in the recovery of any injury) and supplementation (Ginkgo Biloba, Ginseng, L-Arginine, Fish Oils, Vitamins E, D, C, B complex and Zinc)
No masturbation, no sex, NO PORN. And no pictures, no Instagram girls, nothing. Just hugs and kisses from the girlfriend. (Alright… We make love, but only with my hands and mouth. I don’t let her touch my penis… I was in this hardmode for 4 weeks. In the last week, I have been trying very light Edging (5 minutes of very light massage, very soft touches, always with REVERSE KEGEL), every other day, to give a little physiotherapeutic stimulation to the tissues. But without ejaculation (to avoid the Involuntary Kegels associated with orgasm, to keep my libido high and to increase the likelihood of spontaneous erections)

– Lots of REVERSE KEGELS/Front Reverse Kegels, throughout the day.
Very light and Soft Squeezes (“massages”) of the flaccid penis, while Reverse Kegeling, to help relax tissues, throughout the day.
Belly Breath Combos, Hindi Squats and Happy Baby, along with Reverse Kegeling.
– Light external massages, on the anterior/superficial pelvic floor
– 1 hour of STRETCHING (flexibility training) every other day – Pelvic Floor, Hamstrings, Psoas, Piriformis, Quadriceps, Adductors and Abs. (All along with Reverse Kegeling and Belly Breaths). Again, hardmode – Static, Dynamic and Weighted Stretches. I’m literally training to do the front and side splits.

HEAT. Heat relaxes muscles and dilates arteries, increasing blood flow and, consequently, relieving symptoms. I wear shorts, under my pants, during the day. When I get home, I wrap my lower body in a blanket and I use a hot rice sock sometimes. And I place a big and soft pillow under my buttocks, when I am sitting in my chair.

– Sleep. A lot. (Very important in the recovery of any injury)
– I am a very active person (running and weighted calisthenics), but I stopped this type of physical activity since the day of the injury (to avoid Involuntary Kegels). However, I am doing some bodyweight Squats and Hip Thrusts (along with Reverse Kegels) before stretching. I read somewhere that gluteal and posterior chain strength is also important.

ABSOLUTELY NO STRESS (!!!). I have always been a very calm and peaceful person, in all situations of my life. But, after reading that Hard Flaccid was highly influenced by stress and anxiety, I am now completely in a “ZEN state with the Universe” Buddhist monk style.

Not only to avoid any nerve discharge from the Sympathetic Nervous System to the pelvic floor (and, consequently, Involuntary Kegeling, which prolongs the contraction of the pelvic floor muscles, which worsens the compression of nerves and arteries), but also to prevent the rise of Cortisol and Adrenaline and, consequently, the drop in testosterone levels. And (as many of you claim) this is absolutely essential.

I was a little stressed during the first week (before I knew the real diagnosis) and my penis was terrible… Hard Flaccid like a rock, with a loss of 1.5inches in BPFL. After knowing that I really have to relax completely, I immediately felt the first improvements in 3-4 days.

However, on the other hand, I am very convinced that I did a muscle strain, at least, of the Left IC. Those left curvature and left twist… Hmmm… On August 27, I will ask for an MRI. If the radiologist tells me it is normal, I will try to take the images to more doctors.

So… after almost 2 months, I have improved a lot – Now, I only have hard flaccid if I’m standing. A few times, I don’t even have it standing. It happens when I get up after doing Reverse Kegels for a few minutes (or sitting for a while in a more comfortable position) and continue to do Reverse Kegeling while I’m standing. This was impossible 1 month ago.
– The morning erections are progressively coming back
– 3 days ago, I’ve managed to have a 8-9/10 erection during the mini Edging sessions.
– However, I still have a slight bend to the left and the clockwise twist, during erection (I no longer have the downward curve), and I lost about 0.5 inches in BPEL…

1- Now, I would like to ask Pegym’s brightest minds and everyone in this group who is still recovering from Hard Flaccid, what are the most recent updates on this disease/symptom? Regarding physical treatment, exercises, medications and supplements. What am I missing? Where can I improve to speed up recovery?

2- I have been thinking about starting to do a small daily session of Kegels/Front Kegels/IC kegels… In order to give a physiotherapeutic stimulus, just like any other muscle injury. But I’m afraid it could get worse… What’s your opinion? (See post 26)

3- What do you think about adding very light and soft manual penile stretches? (along with Reverse Kegeling) I feel a lot of relief with the soft squeezes. But, in these, the applied force is perpendicular to the penis. I’m not sure if extra parallel force will be beneficial for the tissues. (See post 26)

4- Okay, the last question might be a little funny, but I think it might be relevant. I think I have an injury mostly on the left side. So, is it more advisable to rest the penis in the left groin or in the right groin? It tends to get softer on the right, but naturally falls to the left. (See post 26)

Thanks a lot for reading my story Best regards to the entire PEGym community
And thank you so much, for saving me during the past 2 months UPDATES: post 21, post 23 (stress management), post 26, post 29, post 63, post 66 (HF & Stretching)

Common Causes of Impotence

Common Causes of Impotence

By Sara Ryding, B.Sc.

Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.

This article is a repost which originally appeared on NEWS MEDICAL

Edited for content

Impotence, which is also known as erectile dysfunction, is the inability to get and maintain an erection for intercourse. While the occasional issue with impotence is not considered rare or cause for concern, persistent issues can cause severe stress and be a sign of an underlying health issue. The causes of impotence can include physical and psychological sources.

Impotence and sexual arousal

The processes around sexual arousal are complex and can be difficult to distinguish. For males, the sexual arousal process involves the brain, hormones, emotions, nerves, muscles, and blood vessels to achieve an erection.

As such, impotence can stem from any of these areas or a combination of them. For example, impotence caused by blood vessel issues can be worsened by subsequent stress and mental health concerns.

Physical causes of impotence

Vascular causes of impotence are among the most common causes of impotence. In some cases, impotence can be a symptom of progression towards cardiovascular disease. For example, impotence is common in people with atherosclerosis and can later progress into heart disease. If the veins are unable to close during an erection, this can cause impotence as it hinders the erection from being maintained. This is called veno-occlusive dysfunction.

Veno-occlusive dysfunction can be caused by the development of venous channels that drain blood from the corpora cavernosa where blood would otherwise be trapped during health erections. Veno-occlusive dysfunction can also be caused by deleterious alterations to the tunica albuginea, which would otherwise be responsible for stopping blood from leaving the penis. These alterations can occur as a result of old age, diabetes, or Peyronie’s disease. Other causes include traumatic injury, alterations to muscles around the area, and shunts that are acquired during certain surgery.

Neurological issues are another physical cause of impotence. This can occur as a result of diseases, such as Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s disease, or due to trauma and injury. These can cause impotence by both decreasing libidos and by inhibiting the onset of an erection. In the event of spinal cord injury, the effect on impotence can depend on the nature, location, and extent of the injury. Similarly, neurological issues can be the cause of impotence in old age as sensory stimuli abate with age.

There is some evidence that hormonal issues can cause impotence. A deficiency in androgen, a hormone needed for male sexual characteristics and sex drive, can lower nocturnal erections and decrease libido. However, there is also evidence that erections in response to sexual stimulation still occur in patients with decreased hormonal activity, meaning androgen is not essential.

Psychological causes of impotence

Psychological issues were previously believed to be the main cause of impotence, and it is still considered a common cause of impotence. If the onset of impotence is sudden, this might indicate that the cause is psychological rather than physical.

Psychological issues can range from serious mental disorders, such as schizophrenia, to issues in the relationship with whom impotence occurs. The brain is a starting point for sexual arousal, and issues at this stage can be detrimental to the onset of an erection.

Mental health issues such as depression have a particularly strong link to impotence. This can be due to a lack of libido, performance anxiety, or persistent loss of interest and enjoyment. In schizophrenic people, lowered libido is the main cause of impotence. Some drugs to treat schizophrenia can increase libido, but there can still be persistent issues with erections and orgasms.

Risk factors of impotence

While the causes of impotence can be physical and psychological, there are certain lifestyle and medical factors that can increase the risk of these causes. For example, using tobacco can restrict blood flow the veins and arteries and can thus, over time, lead to vasculature issues which lead to impotence.

Age is one of the biggest risk factors in impotence. Impotence occurs in around 20-40% of older men. Studies have found that the risk of impotence rises by 10% every year in men aged 40-70 years old. The reasons for this are numerous: the penis becomes less sensitive to stimulation, hormone levels decrease, cardiovascular issues become more common, and libido naturally decreases with age.

Other risk factors include obesity, injuries that damage nerves or arteries that are involved in erections, persistent drinking, or alcoholism. Impotence can be avoided by sometimes making changes to lifestyle, such as reducing drinking and smoking but may sometimes need focused treatment. Other times, medical treatments such as radiation treatment or prostate surgery can be risk factors for impotence and may be needed to save the patient’s life.

Sources

  • Mayo Clinic. 2020. Erectile Dysfunction – Symptoms and Causes. [online] Available at: <https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/erectile-dysfunction/symptoms-causes/syc-20355776> [Accessed 26 August 2020].
  • Lue, T., 2000. Erectile Dysfunction. New England Journal of Medicine, 342(24), pp. 1802-1813.
  • Wyllie, M., 2005. The underlying pathophysiology and causes of erectile dysfunction. Clinical Cornerstone, 7(1), pp. 19-26.

Male Sexual Worries: Trends in the Post-Viagra Age

Male Sexual Worries: Trends in the Post-Viagra Age

This article is a repost which originally appeared on SciTechDaily

Edited for content

Trends in reasons for visiting a the San Raffaele sexual health clinic. Credit: This diagram appears with the permission of the authors and the International Journal of Impotence Research. The EAU thanks the authors, and the journal for their cooperation.

Scientists report a change in why men seek help for sexual problems, with fewer men complaining about impotence (erectile dysfunction) and premature ejaculation, and more men, especially younger men, complaining about low sexual desire and curvature of the penis (Peyronie’s disease).

Presenting the work at the European Association of Urology (virtual) Congress, after recent acceptance for publication, research leader Dr. Paolo Capogrosso (San Raffaele Hospital, Milan, Italy) said:

“Over a 10 year period we have seen a real change in what concerns men when they attend sexual health clinics. This is probably driven by greater openness, and men now accepting that many sexual problems can be treated, rather than being something they don’t want to talk about.”

The success of erectile dysfunction treatments such as Viagra and Cialis, and the availability of new treatments, means that men facing sexual problems have now have treatments for sexual problems which weren’t available a generation ago. Now researchers at San Raffaele Hospital in Milan have studied why men come to sexual health clinics, and how this has changed over a 10-year period.

In what is believed to be the first research of its kind, the scientists questioned 3244 male visitors to the San Raffaele Hospital Sexual Health Clinic in Milan over a 10 year period (2009 to 2019), and classified the main reason for the visit. They found that the number of patients visiting with erectile dysfunction problems increased from 2009 to 2013, then started to decrease.

There were comparatively few patients complaining of low sex drive or Peyronie’s disease in 2009, but complaints about both of these conditions grow from 2009 to the end of the study. In 2019 men were around 30% more likely to report Peyronie’s disease than in 2009, and around 32% more likely to report low sexual desire.

The amount of men complaining of premature ejaculation dropped by around 6% over the 10-year period. The average age of first attendance at the clinical also dropped, from a mean of 61 to 53 years.

“Erectile dysfunction is still the main reason for attending the clinic, but this number is dropping, whereas around 35% of men attending the clinic now complain of Peyronie’s disease, and that number has shown steady growth,” said Paolo Capogrosso. “Our patients are also getting younger, which may reflect a generational change in attitude to sexual problems.”

Dr. Capogrosso continued “We need to be clear about what these figures mean. They do not indicate any change in the prevalence of these conditions, what they show is why men came to the clinic. In other words, it shows what they are concerned about. The changes probably also reflect the availability of treatments; as treatments for sexual conditions have become available over the last few years, men are less likely to suffer in silence.”

These are results from a single centre, so they need to be confirmed by more inclusive studies. “Nevertheless there seems to be a growing awareness of conditions such as Peyronie’s disease, with articles appearing in the popular press*. In addition, we know that the awareness of this condition is increasing in the USA and elsewhere, so this may be a general trend,**” said Dr. Capogrosso.

Commenting, Dr Mikkel Fode (Associate Professor of Urology at University of Copenhagen), said:

“Although these data are somewhat preliminary as they stem from single institution they are interesting because they allow us to formulate several hypotheses. For example the drop in men presenting with erectile dysfunction may mean that family physicians are becoming more comfortable addressing this issue and that the patients are never referred to specialized centers. Likewise, the simultaneous drop in age at presentation and increase in Peyronie’s disease and low sex drive could indicate that both men and their partners are becoming more mindful to optimizing their sex lives. I will be very interesting to see if these trends are also present in other centers around the world.”

Dr. Fode was not involved in this work, this is an independent comment.

References:

* “Trends in reported male sexual dysfunction over the past decade: an evolving landscape” by Edoardo Pozzi, Paolo Capogrosso, Luca Boeri, Walter Cazzaniga, Rayan Matloob, Eugenio Ventimiglia, Davide Oreggia, Nicolò Schifano, Luigi Candela, Costantino Abbate, Francesco Montorsi and Andrea Salonia, 1 July 2020, International Journal of Impotence Research.

** “The Prevalence of Peyronie’s Disease in the United States: A Population-Based Study” by Mark Stuntz, Anna Perlaky, Franka des Vignes, Tassos Kyriakides and Dan Glass, 23 February 2016, PLOS ONE.
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0150157
PMCID: PMC4764365

8 Penis-Friendly Foods to Boost T-Levels, Sperm Count, and More

The best way to boost penis health? Food.

Medically reviewed by Katherine Marengo, LDN, RD — Written by Tiffany LaForge — Updated on October 23, 2018

This article is a repost which originally appeared on HealthLine

Edited for content

We often eat with our hearts and stomachs in mind, but how often do we consider how foods affect extremely specific body parts?

First things first though: no matter what we eat, the benefits are holistic — it goes where our bodies need it.

But, let’s say, if you know, that apples and carrots are good for your prostate and penis health, wouldn’t you be inclined to eat these foods more often?

That’s the goal of our below-the-belt food list.

Instead of eating as if your penis needs special attention, fill your day with foods that optimize your whole body, and in turn, help your blood bring the nutrients, vitamins, and minerals your penis needs to function. (Erectile dysfunction in younger men is rising and about 1 in 9 men will develop prostate cancer in their lifetime.)

On the plus side, enhancing your diet just might help with other concerns, such as heart disease, hormonal imbalances, fat burn, and more.

From prostate cancer, low T-levels, ED, and possibly infertility, these foods are here to help.

1. Spinach to boost testosterone levels

Spinach worked for Popeye, and it’ll help you, too.

Spinach is a super source of folate, a known blood flow-booster. Folic acid plays a critical role in male sexual function and a deficiency in folic acid has been linked to erectile dysfunction.

Cooked spinach contains 66 percent of your daily folic acid requirement per cup, making it one of the most folate-rich foods around. Additionally, spinach contains a fair amount of magnesium, which also helps improve and stimulate blood flow and has been shown to boost testosterone levels.

Spinach for penile health

  • A good source of folic acid which may help prevent erectile dysfunction.
  • Contains magnesium which has been shown to boost testosterone.
  • Pro-tip: Try our favorite spinach recipes for your next date night.

2. A daily cup of coffee for better sex

Your morning cup of java can be a below-the-belt pick-me-up, too!

Studies have found that drinking two to three cups of coffee a day may prevent erectile dysfunction. This is thanks to coffee’s most beloved ingredient: caffeine.

Caffeine is shown to improve blood flow by relaxing penile arteries and muscles, leading to stronger erections. Cheers!

Caffeine for penile health

  • Caffeine has been shown to prevent erectile dysfunction.
  • Improves blood flow by relaxing penile arteries and muscles.
  • Pro-tip: Not a fan of coffee? You can get your daily caffeine fix from Yerba Mate or matcha instead.

3. Apple peels to prevent prostate cancer

Apples have some great all-around health benefits, but one of their lesser known advantages pertains to penis health.

Apple peels, in particular, contain the active compound ursolic acid. This compound has been shown in cell studies to stop the growth of prostate cancer cells by “starving” the cells. Still, you should always follow a medical professional’s treatment plan when faced with prostate cancer.

Eat more fruits and veggies Grapes, berries, and turmeric also have similar effects. Studies suggest that men who consume more fruits and vegetables in general have better odds at beating prostate cancer.

Apples for penile health

  • Contain an active compound that may starve prostate cancer cells.
  • Men who consume more fruits and vegetables have a better prostate cancer survival rate.
  • Pro-tip: The cancer-fighting compound is contained in the peel so be sure to eat your apples with the skin on. You can also make dried apple chips or apple peel tea.

4. Supercharge your libido with avocados

The Aztecs were on to something when they named the avocado tree the “testicle tree.”

An excellent source of healthy fats, potassium, and vitamins, avocados are great for getting you in the mood.

This toast-topper favorite has vitamin E and zinc, both of which have positive effects on male sex drive and fertility. Zinc has been suggested to increase levels of free testosterone in the body, while vitamin E may improve sperm quality.

Avocados for penile health

  • Contain zinc which increases testosterone levels.
  • Are a good source of vitamin E which improves sperm quality.
  • Pro-tip: Out of ideas beyond guacamole and toast? Find inspiration with our 23 delicious ways to eat an avocado.

5. Chili peppers to spice up the bedroom

Can you handle the heat? Studies have found that men who consume spicy foods have higher-than-average testosterone levels.

While this doesn’t mean spicy food gives you testosterone, the chemical capsaicin has been shown to have bedroom advantages.

Found in hot sauce and chili peppers, capsaicin triggers the release of endorphins — the “feel good” hormone — and can rev up the libido.

Chili peppers for penile health

  • Men who eat spicy foods have higher-than-average T-levels.
  • Capsaicin found in chili peppers triggers the release of endorphins.
  • Pro-tip: There’s more health benefits to spicy foods than a healthy libido. Read about our top five here.

6. Carrots keep your sperm healthy

Looking to improve your sperm count? Science says to eat more carrots.

This fertility superfood may improve both sperm count and motility (the movement and swimming of sperm).

Research suggests this is due to the chemical carotenoids found in carrots, which is also responsible for giving the vegetable its orange color.

Carrots for penile health

  • Research finds that carrots can improve male fertility.
  • Carotenoids found in carrots may improve sperm quality and motility.
  • Pro-tip: Another vegetable high in carotenoids is sweet potatoes, which makes our list of the 14 healthiest vegetables on earth alongside carrots.

7. Oats for a bigger O

Oatmeal might not come to mind when you think of the world’s sexiest foods — but maybe it should!

Oats can be beneficial for reaching orgasm and Avena Sativa (wild oats) is considered an aphrodisiac. The amino acid L-arginine found in oats has also been shown to treat erectile dysfunction.

Like Viagra, L-arginine helps penile blood vessels relax, which is essential to maintaining an erection and reaching orgasm.

Oats for penile health

  • Wild oats are a known aphrodisiac.
  • Amino acids found in oats relax blood vessels and can help with erectile dysfunction.
  • Pro-tip: New to oats? Try our quick and easy 10-minute overnight oats, made three ways.

8. Tomatoes are a penile health trifecta

Want all the benefits in one punch? Start with tomatoes.

Tomatoes include several of the benefits listed above and can be eaten in a variety of ways.

Research shows lycopene-rich foods, like tomatoes, may help prevent prostate cancer.

Tomatoes might also be beneficial to male fertility and sperm quality — as tomatoes seem to significantly improve sperm concentration, motility, and morphology.

Tomatoes for penile health

  • Help prevent prostate cancer.
  • Are beneficial to male fertility and improve sperm concentration, motility, and morphology.
  • Pro-tip: Too busy to make your own marinara? You don’t just have to cook with tomatoes. Try drinking tomato juice for a quick and healthy way to get your daily lycopene.

Looking for more ways to ensure below-the-belt health? Check out our best tips to prevent prostate cancer and non-penile advice on improving your sex life.

After all, your health is more than one body part.


Doctor has seen a surge in men asking for penis injections | Metro News

Doctor says she’s seen a surge in men asking for penis injections to last longer in bed in lockdown

Ellen Scott

This article is a repost which originally appeared on Metro News

Dr Shirin Lakhani says she receives five enquiries a day about penis injections

Could time in lockdown be upping the pressure for men to last longer in bed and have rock-hard erections at a moment’s notice?

A leading intimate health specialist and doctor, Dr Shirin Lakhani, says she’s seen a dramatic rise in enquiries for her P-shot procedure – a treatment that sees blood injected into the penis – since lockdown came into place.

She reckons this may be down to all the stress of the pandemic – from lost income to health-related anxieties – causing erectile issues and other struggles in bed, along with dips in sex drives.

But she also believes that all the time cooped up at home might allow previously hidden sexual issues to become apparent to the person’s partner.

As a result, Dr Lakhani has seen a huge increase in the number of men getting in touch to ask about her treatment, receiving five enquiries a day since lockdown began.

The P-shot procedure, also known as the Priapus Shot, involves injecting the penis with a patient’s own platelet rich plasma, which it’s thought can stimulate the growth of new tissue and increase blood flow, thus strengthening erections and enhancing the penis’s appearance, too.

It’s similar to the vampire facial you’ve likely heard about… except the needle is going into your penis instead of your face.

The treatment costs £1,200, so yes, it’s on the pricey side.

‘A lot of the men I’m hearing from have struggled with sexual intercourse for years but have until now managed to hide the fact that they are unable to get an erection or can’t ejaculate,’ says Dr Lakhani. ‘Before lockdown they managed to hide their problem behind the fact that they were tired from work or because they were physically away a lot due to work.

‘Now though with the country stuck in lockdown problems such as these are impossible to ignore.

‘Once upon a time sexual dysfunction, or the difficulty by an individual or couple during any normal sexual activity, including pleasure, desire, preference, arousal or orgasm, was very much a taboo subject.

‘At times like this people are turning to social media more and beginning to realise how many options there are out there to help treat sexual dysfunction. And with studies showing that at least a third of us have experienced these types of problems at some point in our lives, it’s certainly widespread.

The P-shot is among a large swell in cosmetic procedures aimed squarely at boosting men’s genitals, from one type of injection that a surgeon claims can increase the size of a penis by two inches to the trend for getting filler to make the testicles larger.

If you do choose to go down the route of injections or other cosmetic treatments, remember that these are medical treatments that need to be done by a professional in a safe and sanitised setting. Just because we’re talking about injections rather than in-depth surgery doesn’t mean the risks disappear, and getting shots from a dodgy practitioner could leave you with far more severe penis problems than you started with.

But while such cosmetic treatments could help to tweak certain parts of a man’s appearance and sexual performance, it’s vital to explore all options before rushing into any procedure. Longterm difficulties getting or maintaining an erection can be caused by all sorts of factors, including depression, stress, heart disease, and high cholesterol – all of which need addressing by a medical professional.

If erectile dysfunction is a symptom of another issue, it’s crucial to talk to your GP to get to the root of the problem rather than just tackling one more obvious way an illness might be rearing its head.
Plus, you could end up saving yourself time, pain, and money by figuring out a more obvious cause and solution for problems in the bedroom – reducing your stress levels and improving communication with your partner are both free, FYI.

‘The main thing is that in this day and age no man should suffer these symptoms in silence,’ says Dr Lakhani. ‘They can not only impact on a man physically but also over a prolonged period of time place a huge pressure on mental health.

‘Being comfortable in your own skin is a major factor in promoting sexual health. It’s not about being perfect, it’s about body confidence, good health and communication with your partner.

‘Many men and women don’t talk about their intimate health and find it embarrassing to seek help but it doesn’t have to be a taboo subject.

‘We should feel comfortable enough to talk about the issues we experience with intimate health and everyone should be allowed to enjoy sex.’

 

UK man who survived testicular cancer becomes father: Here’s how to do testicle self-exam

UK man who survived testicular cancer becomes father: Here’s how to do testicle self-exam

Unlike other cancers, testicular cancer is much more common in younger men. Doctors recommend regular testicle self-examination to identify testicular cancer at its earliest stage. Watch out for these warning signs and symptoms.

By: Longjam Dineshwori

This article is a repost which originally appeared on THE Health Site

In what could be called a miracle, a UK man who lost his right testicle to cancer recently became a father. Joseph Kelley Hook was diagnosed with testicular cancer in 2017, when he was 29. Joseph knew something was very wrong when started feeling agonising pain in his groin and his right testicle had tripled in size. After a long fight, he finally defeated the cancer and was declared all clear in January 2018. But he never thought he would be able to have kids as he had his right testicle removed, plus chemo is known to reduce fertility. [The testicles produce male sex hormones and sperm for reproduction].

But in March this year, Joseph became a father when his partner Rachel gave birth to their son Jacob. He had frozen his sperm in case the couple ever needed it for IVF. But amazingly, he and Rachel were able to conceive naturally and didn’t need IVF.

Doctors in the UK say that testicular cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in young men in the country. Joseph felt lucky that his cancer was caught early because of which could beat the deadly disease. He suggests all men to check their testicles and go to a doctor if they see or feel any changes.

Testicular cancer: Causes and risk factors

Compared with other types of cancer, testicular cancer is rare. But unlike other cancers, it is much more common in younger men, particularly those between ages 15 and 35. Men in their 30s are said to be at highest risk. Usually, testicular cancer affects only one testicle.

Doctors are not clear about what causes testicular cancer in most cases. But they know that it occurs when healthy cells in a testicle become altered. Sometimes some cells may develop abnormalities and grow out of control. These accumulating cancer cells may form a mass in the testicle. Testicular cancers mostly begin in the germ cells — the cells in the testicles that produce immature sperm. But what causes these cells to become abnormal and develop into cancer is unclear.

Factors that may increase your risk of testicular cancer include: An undescended testicle (cryptorchidism), abnormal testicle development, family history, age, and race. Testicular cancer is found to be more common in white men than in black men. Unfortunately, there’s no way to prevent this cancer from occurring.

Know the signs and symptoms of testicular cancer

In almost all diseases, early detection can lead to better treatment results and higher survival rate. Luckily, testicular cancer is highly treatable. The treatment will, however, depend on the type and stage of testicular cancer. Doctors also recommend regular testicle self-examination to identify testicular cancer at its earliest stage. So, watch out for these warning symptoms of testicular cancer to get it treated early.

  • A lump or enlargement in either testicle
  • Feeling of heaviness in the scrotum
  • Dull ache in the abdomen or groin
  • A sudden collection of fluid in the scrotum
  • Pain or discomfort in a testicle or the scrotum
  • Enlargement or tenderness of the breasts
  • Back pain

If any pain, swelling or lumps in your testicles or groin last longer than two weeks, you need to see a doctor.